The Whitney: A Photo Journal

Visiting the Whitney Plantation was enlightening and overwhelming. Never before had I learned about the brilliance of enslaved peoples but our tour guide at the Whitney pointed out how enslaved peoples were cherry-picked from Africa for their knowledge about specific trades and cultivating certain crops. The Whitney Plantation Museum works tirelessly and intentionally to tell the truth of the brutuality of slavery and what went on at this plantation. Below, through photographs I took, I want to highlight aspects of the tour that stuck out the most to me.

 A condensed history of slavery relating to the Whitney Plantation

A condensed history of slavery relating to the Whitney Plantation

 The names of children born on the plantation into slavery

The names of children born on the plantation into slavery

 The “Jamaica Train”, a series of open kettles in which sugar cane juice was heated

The “Jamaica Train”, a series of open kettles in which sugar cane juice was heated

 Slave cabins

Slave cabins

 Inside the quarters of enslaved peoples

Inside the quarters of enslaved peoples

 The bars of a cage that enslaved peoples were held in during the auction process

The bars of a cage that enslaved peoples were held in during the auction process

 Bricks on the floor of the Haydel home laid by slaves

Bricks on the floor of the Haydel home laid by slaves

 Memorials of enslaved peoples—the only thing that is memorializing their deaths

Memorials of enslaved peoples—the only thing that is memorializing their deaths

 The Field of Angels—a memorial for the enslaved children in Louisiana who died before their 3rd birthday—with our tour guide in the background

The Field of Angels—a memorial for the enslaved children in Louisiana who died before their 3rd birthday—with our tour guide in the background